Troubleshooting and Replacing Your Forced Air Kerosene Heater



When you’re trying to find a forced air kerosene heater, it’s easy to get carried away and go for something that doesn’t really offer you all that much. Whether you’re looking at outdoor fireplaces or even indoor fireplaces, many of them use kerosene as a means of providing warmth. While it’s true that you can heat your home with this fuel source, it’s also true that there are some disadvantages. Read on to learn about some of these disadvantages.



Fuel gauge

Fuel gauge
Fuel gauge

One of the first things that you need to pay attention to is the fuel gauge. Many people assume that they have one of these items on the unit when it actually does not. If it doesn’t read 100%, then there are a few things that you can do to diagnose what is going on.

You should always pay close attention to the fuel gauge on your forced air heater. This is the gauge that will typically tell you if the unit is working properly. In order for it to read properly, it needs to be within about ten thousand square feet of the heating source. If it reads anything other than ten thousand, you may want to consider a different model.

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Strange colors

Strange colors
Strange colors

The next thing that you should look out for is if the heater is throwing off any kind of strange colors. This is a very common issue. The problem with most forced air is that the fuel is not being burned as efficiently as it should be. Instead of reaching the heating element, the fuel gets in the air and begins to burn. You’ll commonly see orange or yellow hues coming from the flame.



Uptake

Uptake
Uptake

When this happens, you should know that your heater is suffering from what is called an “uptake”. What does this mean? It means that the fuel (or oil) level in your burner is being cut off. This is a very common occurrence, and there are a few things that you can do to prevent it. The first thing that I would suggest that you do is change your filter.

Many people don’t realize that they should change their heating oil on their kerosene heater every three months. If you don’t, you can expect for your levels to increase slightly because of the amount of moisture that is in the wick. The bottom line is that if you notice your heater cutting off during a cold winter night, take the time to replace the wick. The longer that the wick is exposed to cold air, the more chance there is for the fuel to reach its burning point.

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After changing the oil…

After changing the oil
After changing the oil

After changing the oil, you should inspect the fuel tank to see how much beyond the normal level of debris you can remove. You should never attempt to use any type of fuel that is beyond the normal or safe level. If you are using your indoor kerosene heater to heat your attic, you should also have it inspected on a regular basis. If you notice anything wrong, you should take the necessary steps to have it repaired or replaced.



If your fuel gauge shows a low reading, you should remove the wheeled frame from the house and put it in a secure place. Then you should turn the power off to the house. It may take a few minutes but the fuel tank will settle to the bottom and be safe. Now you can open up the valve on the bottom of the kerosene tank and take a look at the float bowl assembly. If you find leaks or cracks in the float bowl assembly, you should have it repaired or replaced before using your new heater. Remember that having an indoor kerosene heater in your house is a very good idea, as it can give you excellent heating efficiency.

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